Idris Kamil Shapes the Property Market by Explaining the Challenges of Globalization

Idris Kamil Shapes the Property Market by Explaining the Challenges of Globalization

Idris Kamil was born in 1952. He hails from Sudan and is a scholar as well as an international civil servant. He has played instrumental roles like serving as the director for World Intellectual Property Organization between 1997 and 2008. Additionally, he served as the head of the department of International Union for Protection of New Varieties of Plants.

 

Education

Idris Kamil is an alumnus of many universities including Khartoum University, Cairo University, Ohio University, University of Geneva, and Indira Gandhi National Open University. He pursued law, arts, international law affairs, theories, and a doctorate in law respectively.

 

Career and Experience

Kamil first worked at International Law Commission in 1992. He served until 1996 when he joined WIPO as the director. He served for six years before succeeding Arpad Bogsch who was in charge of the department for 25 years. In his tenure, he oversaw WIPO’s efforts to nurture the global property market. It was in 1998 that he met America’s secretary for commerce and discussed safeguarding American ingenuity. The meeting earned him a second role as the director of WIPO where he donated part of his salary to support developing states.

 

Contribution

Idris Kamil believes that globalization has created a cosmopolitan society. As such, people in developing states can gain from globalization through obtaining cheaper commodities from foreign countries. This allows them to save more money. On the other hand, developed states like America benefit from globalization since because they earn more income by selling exported commodities. Kamil says that intellectual property is essential for countries that are developing. He also notes these countries benefit by gaining information, ideas, and knowledge. Besides, globalization drives every country’s economy.

Opinion

Even though globalization confers instrumental benefits to growing countries, it has its challenges especially for states that want to operate in revolutionary, international economy. The movement of intellectual property between these states can be difficult. Some of these challenges include legal pitfalls and unequal technical expertise. A good example of some of the challenges include the case of China when the U.S. accused it of smuggling patents into their country.

 

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